Facebook Twitter Feed

Manitoba Throne Speech leaves health care questions unanswered

Winnipeg —The Government of Manitoba, led by Premier Brian Pallister, delivered today’s Speech from the Throne outlining the Pallister government’s priorities for the next year.

When it comes to health care, this underwhelming Throne Speech raises more questions than it answers and makes no mention of the Allied Health Professionals that make health care delivery possible.

The Speech made reference to a “$2-billion Health Care Guarantee,” but the reality is that recent health care spending in Manitoba has not kept up with the rate of inflation.

“We are concerned that further cuts are coming, particularly in rural health care, while we’re still dealing with the fallout from recent cuts and closures in Winnipeg,” said MAHCP President Bob Moroz.

In recent weeks, the Pallister government has announced welcome investments in mental health and addictions, and the Speech promised more. However, much more significant investment is needed in this critical area to meet the pressing needs in our province.

The Speech announced 200 more nursing positions over four years. “We’re waiting to hear how many new professional-technical positions this government will create – more nurses and doctors can’t do their jobs without more Allied Health Professionals,” said Moroz. “MAHCP’s Allied Health members are already stretched and need reassurance from this government that they will have the resources to provide the care patients expect and deserve.”

To ensure stability for those working in health care, MAHCP is also encouraging the Provincial Government to return to the collective bargaining table as soon as possible.

“MAHCP is deeply concerned about the path the Provincial Government is taking when it comes to our health care,” said Moroz. “Manitoba is already facing recruitment challenges and our members are feeling the crunch with more mandatory overtime. They are being asked to do more with less, and many are dealing with lack of training and resources, chronic understaffing and high turnover.”